The curious case of Scottish money in Swaledale

A Muker Manor court record of 1686 showing an example of partible inheritance creating rents involving placks. Facsimile created by Timothy Bagenal. Image courtesy of North Yorkshire County Records Office and Swaledale and Arkengarthdale Archaeology Group.

A Muker Manor court record of 1686 showing an example of partible inheritance creating rents involving placks. Facsimile created by Timothy Bagenal. Image courtesy of North Yorkshire County Records Office and Swaledale and Arkengarthdale Archaeology Group.

The court books of the manors of Healaugh and Muker in Swaledale, from the earliest in 1686 until 1712, show that some of the annual rents paid by copyhold tenants included an unfamiliar monetary denomination – a plack.

The rents were recorded in words and digits, making it clear that the value of a plack was one-sixth of a penny. But it wasn’t even a denomination of English currency. It was Scottish. And even in Scotland it was long-since obsolete. So what was going on? Read more here: Value of a plack: the curious case of Scottish money in Swaledale.

Advertisements

About Will Swales

Amateur historian with a special interest in Swaledale, Yorkshire.
This entry was posted in Swaledale history and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The curious case of Scottish money in Swaledale

  1. Alan Mills says:

    Very interesting Will.
    Alan

    Like

  2. Lawrence Alderson says:

    It is very interesting to me as some of my ancestors came out of upper Swaledale around that time.
    Lawrence

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s